I can hardly believe it: I am hitting 2,000 days in a row of my outdoor habit. That’s 2,000 days of spending at least 20 consecutive minutes outside every single day, no matter the weather.

So what have I learned over 2,000 days? Unlike my 1,000 day mark, my 2,000th day is in the dead of winter. That means my three 2,000th day lessons are winter lessons — and they look a little different than the lessons found during the good summer weather.

[:35] Celebrating 2,000 days of my outdoor habit

[:48] It wasn’t exactly the goal

[1:06] This isn’t at all like my 1,000th day outside

[1:33] The difference between the things you learn

[2:00] What the lessons of other anniversaries show — and how this is different

[2:30] Lesson one: Knowing I can do hard things

[3:18] Lesson two: “I live in abundance”

[4:06] Lesson three: knowing the value of taking it slow

[5:07] How I’m marking 2,000 days outside

What would happen if you made room each week for one big adventure and one little adventure?

It’s a pretty simple concept: each week, purposefully do one small out of the ordinary, a “little adventure,” and one thing bigger that might take up to several hours, a “big adventure.” They don’t have to be outside. But they certainly can be.

In this episode Amy explains how she’s taking on the challenge, presented in Laura Vanderkam’s recent book Tranquility by Tuesday, how she’s tackling it, a unique spin she’s trying to put on it and the challenges and benefits of doing so. Listen now.

[:45] A little bit about Tranquility by Tuesday

[1:15] All about one big adventure, one little adventure

[2:10] Why I like this idea

[2:52] How this concept looks for me

[3:50] An expanded adventure idea

[4:40] A quick caveat about this

[4:55] My recent really big adventure

[6:30] A snowboard revelation

When was the last time you experienced a sense of awe in nature? Feeling awe is something many outdoor users chase. But can you even define the experience of awe? Or is it one of things where you just know it when you see it? Where can you best find it? And what are the benefits of spending time outside purposefully chasing the feeling?

Professor Dr. Dacher Keltner joins us in this episode to tackle those questions and more. Leaning on research and advice included in his new book “Awe: the new science of wonder and how it can transform your life,” Dacher guides us into an understanding of the what, how and why of chasing awe outside. Listen now.

Connect with this episode:

Read “Awe: the new science of wonder and how it can transform your life(affiliate link)

Visit Dr. Dacher Keltner’s website

Learn about the Greater Good Science Center

Join the Humans Outside Challenge
Follow Humans Outside on Instagram
Follow Humans Outside on Facebook

Some of the good stuff:

[2:52] Dacher Keltner’s favorite outdoor space

[3:35] How Dacher became someone who likes to go outside

[6:47] Can we define awe?
[9:12] How to experience awe in ways that are not specific to going outside

[11:52] How the “eight wonders of life” are all tied to nature anyway

[13:34] Do humans have a need for wild awe?

[15:36] Why don’t we talk about the importance of awe?

[20:01] Can you create an awe habit?

[21:26] Is there such a thing as an awe muscle?

[23:34] What does noticing have to do with it?

[26:28] The difference between “awe” and “wonder”

[28:04] Tips for finding and keeping an awe habit

[30:18] Dacher’s favorite moment of outdoor awe

[2:52] Dacher Keltner’s favorite outdoor space

[3:35] How Dacher became someone who likes to go outside

[6:47] Can we define awe?

[9:12] How to experience awe in ways that are not specific to going outside

[11:52] How the “eight wonders of life” are all tied to nature anyway

[13:34] Do humans have a need for wild awe?

[15:36] Why don’t we talk about the importance of awe?

[20:01] Can you create an awe habit?

[21:26] Is there such a thing as an awe muscle?

[23:34] What does noticing have to do with it?

[26:28] The difference between “awe” and “wonder”

[28:04] Tips for finding and keeping an awe habit

[30:18] Dacher’s favorite moment of outdoor awe

It’s been three years since I launched the Humans Outside podcast in the early winter of 2020. It’s been an incredible ride of learning, growth and outdoor adventures for me as I’ve connected with 101 Humans Outside guests and recorded over 270 episodes. But what were some of the ones that have stuck with me the most?

In this episode I talk about my favorite takeaways from three years of Humans Outside, plus share how you can enter a giveaway I’m hosting to celebrate the Humans Outside birthday. Listen now!

[:50] What podcasting is to me

[1:17] What three years of this podcast means by the numbers

[1:46] What podcasting here means to me

[2:23] A few highlights of the interviews I’ve loved

[7:20] Info about the giveaway

The deep, cold, dark winter of the north is a unique experience that both challenges and inspires. On the one hand, it shows you things about nature and about yourself you’d never see in the long hours of warmer daylight. On the other, it carried a depth that at times feels insurmountable.

Among the winter enthusiasts and survivors are cyclists, people out there riding their bikes through, on and over the ice. They are part of a rich history of people not just exploring the Arctic under their own power, but leaning into the experience despite all the odds. In today’s episode writer and editor Jessica Cherry talks about the experience of cycling through Alaska’s winter. Listen now.

[2:56] Jessica Cherry’s favorite outdoor space

[3:45] How Jessica became someone who likes to go outside

[6:21] Jessica’s personal connection to cycling

[9:42] What is a “fat bike?”

[17:01] About Frank Soos

[18:58] The experience of recreating over winter in the arctic

[21:01] The surprising sound factor

[24:56] What people miss by not going outside in the winter’s darkness

[28:36] How being a climate scientist changes how Jessica experiences nature

[33:09] What Jessica learned from her book, Wheels on Ice

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